Monday, April 22, 2013

Guest Poster, Amy Satterfield: Point of View

Wait, not everything we read in newspapers and magazines is true?! But aren't those supposed to be nonfiction?! These are the sorts of responses I heard from my fifth graders as I taught the following lesson on point of view. Up until this point, my students had never considered the skewed perspectives authors often present in their writing. (This also happens to be a Common Core standard!)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.


To begin our lesson on point of view, we read Shel Silverstein's poem Point of View. (Click on the image for your own copy!) This poem shows how our meals have a very different perspective on dinner than we do. It is a fun little introduction and gives kids a good laugh. At this point, we also talked about how we often tell different versions of the same story. For example, two kids might have an argument at recess. Each of them tells the story completely different. This also happens with professional writers.


Next, we created an anchor chart that explained the meaning of point of view. I read aloud the book Voices in the Park. This book tells the story of one encounter in the park through four different points of view. On our anchor chart we recorded how each point of view affected the story. We noticed that the characters portrayed one another very differently in each version. 


Students glued a copy of the anchor chart into their reader's notebooks and recorded the information as we went along. 


Then, we jumped right in with two articles about the Great Depression. My students were slightly familiar with this historical event. I selected two short articles from Scholastic. One article was an interview with a woman that grew up during the Great Depression, and the other article was about the real "boxcar children." Both articles were about children growing up during the Great Depression, but one was from someone that actually lived during that time. The other was simply created through research. With these articles, we talked about the difference between the perspective of someone who was actually there and someone who was not. One was much more emotional, while the other was simply facts.


The next pair of articles was a a big hit with the students. These articles also came from Scholastic, but were about Tommy Thompson's discovery of the shipwrecked Central America and its large treasure. There is a large controversy surrounding the finding of this treasure and who it rightly belongs to. It was interesting because after reading the first article, the students believed Tommy Thompson was in the right. They thought he worked hard and deserved that treasure. (Mainly because this is what the article says.) After reading the second article, they decided Tommy was selfish, greedy, and some even called him a criminal.  (It is reported that Tommy has not paid his investors or crew.) After reading both articles, I asked students which author described Tommy Thompson accurately. Was he hardworking, or was he greedy and selfish? After much debate, we decided that he was probably somewhere in the middle. We also wondered if we were missing other important details to the story.


With each pair of articles, we completed a graphic organizer comparing and contrasting the two stories based upon their points of view. (Click either image for a copy of the graphic organizer.)


After this lesson, my students and I will continue to read texts with a critical eye, carefully considering the point of view of our author.


Eclectic Educating
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41 comments:

  1. Great lesson! I love that you have a column about how the point of view affected the story in your chart! Thanks for sharing. :)
    Creating Lifelong Learners

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  2. Amy,
    Another useful post from you :0)LOVE it!
    You are so right, students believe that if they read something then it must be fact! My kiddos need some work in this area so I'm definitely going to be trying out your strategy with them.
    Thanks for sharing, I'm pinning this right now.
    FYI- The link to your graphic organizers is not working.
    :0) Melissa
    More Time 2 Teach

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. All is fixed now! The privacy settings were too high. Thanks for letting me know!

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  3. What a great lesson! I was wondering where you got those 4 articles from on Scholastic? Was via the web or a magazine of theirs?

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    1. I use EBSCOhost to get old Scholastic articles. Your school might have a subscription, but if they don't, almost every public library does. You can usually even access your library's account from your home using the internet and your library card. I made this tutorial a couple of months back on how to use EBSCOhost. If all else fails, I can just email them to you. I just can't post them to the public. :)

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  4. I often do point of view journals with our class novels. Students pick a character and re-tell a chapter from the point of view of their character. They are always surprised by the differences in the story a character tells. Thanks for sharing. Caitlin (www.the-room-mom.com)

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  5. I am teaching author's perspective this week with my 4th graders and LOVE this lesson, introduction to culmination. Could you e-mail me those articles from Scholastic? E-mail is bgovier@sikeston.k12.mo.us

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  6. What a great set of materials for teaching point of view. Thank you for sharing on Manic Monday.

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  7. These idea posted here look great! They seem like they would make the kids really think! Thanks for sharing at Manic Monday!

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  8. What a great lesson! Thanks for the freebie. I'm excited to check out the book, Voices in the Park. Sounds like the perfect book for teaching point of view.

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  9. Great lesson ideas!! Thank you for sharing!! Will you email me those 4 articles?
    wrightj@parkhill.k12.mo.us

    Thanks!!

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  10. Hello! Would you be willing to email me the articles you used? Thanks so much! lmccusker@bcps.org

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  11. I would love to put a spin on this lesson with my class! Thank you so very much for sharing! If you have time this weekend, I would greatly appreciate those 4 articles. moosterhouse.bullock@lee.k12.nc.us

    Thanks!

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  12. Great lesson. I got on EBSCO host but some of the texts you used were text only. Can you email them to me at lzaff25@optonline.net

    thanks

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  13. Great lesson! Would you please email me the 4 articles as well? kelly.m.havens@gmail.com

    Thank you!

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  14. I have just started Point of View and I loved the lesson. Would like the articles. My kids would love them! throop94@gmail.com

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  15. I have just started Point of View and I loved the lesson. Would like the articles. My kids would love them! throop94@gmail.com

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  16. HI there! I LOVE this lesson! It is just what I'm looking for! I am wondering if you would email me the Ship of Gold article. I am an active member of Scholastic, and subscribe to Storyworks, but they just won't let me print the article. Thank you so much! sschiavoni@roadrunner.com

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  17. This is a great lesson! Could you please email me the articles at luxc@oxfordpublicschools.org? I too subscribe to Storyworks and cannot access these articles online. Thank you!!!

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  18. I absolutely love this! Thank you for sharing your wonderful ideas with us! Could you please me the articles at mslipsky.507@gmail.com? Thank you!!

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  19. Could you email me the articles at elainekelley8@gmail.com? This is the best lesson I have seen on this skill. Thanks!

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  20. This is excellent! Thanks for sharing! Could you send me the four articles at stones2@tcnj.edu please? Thanks so much!

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  21. This is a powerful lesson on POV. I have Voices in the Park, and would love the four articles from Scholastic. Would you please email them to me mgpoage@aisd.net? Or, could you share them on GoogleDocs? mgpoage. Thank you!

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  22. These articles are exactly what I'm looking for! Thank-you for sharing. Could you email the articles to sschleicher@ccsd89.org.

    I have read Voices in the Park and it's a perfect mentor text for this lesson. Thanks again!

    Susi Schleicher

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    1. Could you please send the articles to me :) aydensmommy@rocketmail.com I have been trying to find articles to teach this benchmark.

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  23. I see that people are asking for the Scholastic articles to be emailed to them. Any way I could have them emailed to me as well? lessarry@spsd.org

    Thanks so much!
    Ryan

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  24. I used your Voices in the Park lesson last year and loved it! I'm excited to use it again this year with my class next week. I just read about your four additional articles and I would love to use them. I've tried looking for them but have ran into trouble since I don't have access to Ebsco. I hate to be the hundredth person to ask, but is there any way you could send me the 4 articles?
    Apowell@randolph.k12.nc.us
    Thank you so much! I love your lessons!
    Amanda

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  25. I would also LOVE to get a copy of the articles. Can't wait to do this lesson in my classroom!
    amy.arledge@lpsb.org

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  26. Can I get a copy of the articles, please? megan_arce@dpsk12.org Thanks!!

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  27. I would also like to request a copy of the articles. brian.baumeyer@evsck12.com Thanks!

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  28. I love your lesson! Would you mind sending me the articles you used in this lesson? dlasmith@aol.com
    Thank you!

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  29. I am really excited to share this lesson with my class. Would you please send me that articles that you used? My efforts to find them on line have only rewarded me with one.

    Caddisdog@yahoo.com

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  30. I am really excited to share this lesson with my class. Would you please send me that articles that you used? My efforts to find them on line have only rewarded me with one.

    Caddisdog@yahoo.com

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  31. I would love these articles as well. I have looked but have been unable to find them. My e-mail is: Kim_rasmussen@lkstevens.wednet.edu

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  32. I would also love copies of the articles. My email is: vronkowski@egf.k12.mn.us. Thank you.

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  33. Can you please send me the article for the great depression? lstogdill@cbcsd.org

    Thank you!! These are AMAZING!

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  34. I would love to do this lesson. Would you be able to email me the articles, please?
    dloza@perris.k12.ca.us

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  35. I love this lesson and can't wait to use it this week in my classroom. Could you send me the 4 articles at ecassavaugh@ffc8.org
    I was planning on trying to teach this lesson on Wednesday. Thanks so much!

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  36. debbie kotler

    Great lesson.. Any chance of sending me the articles ? debbie_kotler@whps.org

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  37. Love this lesson. We are reviewing POV and I believe my students would really be interested in the articles. Could you send me the 4 articles? That would be great! meagan.finley@christian.kyschools.us

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