Friday, March 15, 2013

Showing the LOVE in Math



Have you ever noticed that some students that excel on multiple choice math tests struggle with constructed response assessments that require them to show all of their thinking? This is our first year taking constructed response assessments and I have learned that I have a lot of kids just like this in my classroom. (And even more that didn’t excel at either at the beginning of the year!) Early on, I knew I needed to come up with something to help them remember to show all of their thinking (and then some) on constructed response/word problems. With that, the acronym LOVE was born. You can read more about it here.

L: Label everything! Your visuals, your equation, anything you can put a label on!

O: Our Thinking. For this the students turn the question into a sentence with a blank for the answer. This is huge for them! They know they have to do this first. If they can’t do it, they have to re-read that problem and break it down until they know exactly what is being asked. This part really helps them make sense of the problem and check their answer for reasonableness. Also, it makes sure they actually answer the question! Our current rubric takes off a point for precision if they don’t actually state the answer in words, pulling it back to the problem.

V: Visuals. Our constructed response assessments are on the Fraction domains of common core so visuals are so important.

E: Equations. They must show an equation to represent their visual or to show how they got their answer.

This acronym has worked wonders with my students this year. They know to show the LOVE on any word problem I give them, even morning work. As evidence, we just finished our 2nd constructed response assessment for the year and over half of my kids more than tripled their previous scores. We are talking going from a score of 1 out of 20 to a 14 out of 20. That is HUGE!


As I mentioned above, they show the LOVE on all of their assignments in math. Here are some images from their morning work. Check out all of that writing, drawing, labeling….I LOVE IT!







 How do you prepare your students for constructed response math assessments?





18 comments:

  1. I like this acronym. With all problem solving we ask for number sentences and pictures and for them to be able to explain their thinking - I like the way you add the labels. I've never heard of the term 'constructed response' before - we don't use that here - but do use the same concept. I'm going to try the LOVE acronym though :)

    Lynn

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    1. Hey Lynn! Constructed response is just another term for word problems that are extended response. I hope your kids enjoy the acronym as much as mine!

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  2. I have been using APEC (http://teachingisagift.blogspot.ca/search/label/APEC%20Revisited) for both math and language for the past number of years. I also tried the RAPS method (http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/FREE-How-to-Answer-Text-Based-Questions-in-all-Content-Areas) this year with language. I think I will have to introduce LOVE next. What I like about LOVE is that it is more math based in its application. Gifted students really don't like to "show what they know" so this might get some of the more reluctant writers to add more to their responses. Worth a shot! Thanks for sharing...I guess now I will have to make up a poster or graphic...unless you have one to share??
    Sidney
    Teachingisagift

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    1. Hi Sidney! I have this poster that you may want to use.

      http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Performance-Tasks-Poster-What-to-Include-in-a-Performance-Task

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  3. This is fantastic! I can't wait to share your post with my coworkers! :) I LOVE it! :)

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    1. My favorite part really is saying, "Where is the LOVE?" when they are missing parts! The kids love it, too!

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  4. This is awesome!! Definitely going to use this in my classroom.

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  5. I "might" teach math next year FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER!!! I'm a literacy person. :)

    This is going to be taught from day 1 in my classroom-thanks for sharing the love!!

    Shannon
    http://www.irunreadteach.wordpress.com

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    1. Shannon, I am a literacy person in my heart, but I find math easier to teach! You will love teaching math!

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  6. I wish I had a math teacher like you when I was in school!

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    1. I wish I had an ELA teacher like you, Peanut!

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  7. OH. MY. GOSH. This is amazing. I am so sick of whining at my students to show their work. Haha. This is so much more scaffolded and student-friendly - such a great way to help students understand what showing their work MEANS. Plus, my kids will think it is fun! Can't wait to introduce this on Monday!! Thanks so much for the great idea.

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    1. I wish I would have thought of this years ago! It really makes showing work fun! I never have kids complain about showing the LOVE!

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  8. Yep-I'm definitely teaching math this upcoming year!! So I just printed your poster-thanks so much!

    My coworker wants to use RAPS (we use for reading) so students don't get confused by having too many acronyms, but IMHO I think using the same acronym for reading AND math with different meanings for each letter would be more confusing. :) IMHO

    Shannon
    http://www.irunreadteach.wordpress.com

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  9. This really is incredible. I'm therefore tired of whimpering inside my college students to exhibit their own function. Haha. This really is a lot more scaffolded as well as student-friendly -- this kind of a terrific way to assist college students know very well what displaying their own function INDICATES. In addition, my personal children may believe it is enjoyable! Cannot wait around in order to expose this particular upon Mon!! Many thanks a lot for that good idea.



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